Buff-breasted Sandpiper

It was back out to Boundary Bay again this afternoon with the intent to look for the Little Stint and Snowy Plover again. I started off as I usually do heading west from 104 St. along the tidal flats. There were a few groups of Baird’s Sandpiper which I passed on this time. On approaching the pilings I noted a group of birders on the dyke watching something. Rather than flush anything, I made my way in to speak to them. I learned there was a Buff-breasted Sandpiper in close to the dyke and a Red-necked Grebe just out from the pilings. They also let me know the Little Stint had not been seen since this morning. Prior to moving into position for the Buff-breasted,

Red-necked Grebe
Red-necked Grebe

… I got a picture of the Red-necked Grebe. It is unusual to see one sitting on the mud flats like this. While it seemed alert, it was not moving at all and I could see no obvious signs of injury.

Buff-breasted Sandpiper
Buff-breasted Sandpiper

The Buff-breasted was in close to the dyke along with some Baird’s.

Buff-breasted Sandpiper
Buff-breasted Sandpiper

It was actively foraging for food along the high water line,

Buff-breasted Sandpiper
Buff-breasted Sandpiper

… and as I have found in the past, not adverse to you tagging along.

American Pipit
American Pipit

Providing the occasional distraction were some American Pipits.

Buff-breasted Sandpiper
Buff-breasted Sandpiper

After finishing with the Buff-breasted Sandpiper and meeting Dave, who photographed the Little Stint the other day, we headed out to check the plover and peep flocks that had now shown up. No where near the number of peeps as on previous days and unfortunately no Little Stint.

Of note, on my way back the Red-necked Grebe was gone. Hopefully it was alright and moved back out to open water where it belongs.

American Golden-Plover

It was back out to Boundary Bay this afternoon, only this time I arrived a couple of hours before high tide. While the sun did peek through a few times, it was overcast for the most part. On heading west along the tidal flats from 104 St. things were pretty quiet. As I approached the pilings there were signs of activity. The Plover flock was spread out between there and 96 St.

Dowitcher
Dowitcher

In with the Plovers were some Dowitchers foraging in close to the dyke. For the most part the Plovers were pretty wary of me and kept there distance. Well not all of them as it turned out.

American Golden-Plover
American Golden-Plover

Much to my delight this American Golden-Plover was in amongst the others and was a little more cooperative.

American Golden-Plover
American Golden-Plover

While it did not let me get too close, I did manage a few shots. This was definitely a pleasant surprise for the afternoon.

After this I spotted a group of Pectoral Sandpipers further out on the tidal flats. I made my way out there, but there was no Sharp-tailed Sandpiper with them.

On my way back in with the tide,

American Pipit
American Pipit

… I spent some time trying to get shots of the many American Pipits that were busy along the shoreline.

American Pipit
American Pipit

A fun diversion prior to heading back up on to the dyke.

Pipit & Pectoral

This afternoons walk along the tidal flats of Boundary Bay was not turning up too much.

American Pipit
American Pipit

There were still some American Pipits frequenting the beach,

Pectoral Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper

… along with a few dozen Pectoral Sandpipers.

Pectoral Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper

So I spent a little time with them while they foraged for food on my way back.

Pectoral Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper

I finished with this shot of a Pectoral Sandpiper in one of the tidal pools. I was back up on the dyke when the tide and Black-bellied Plover flock came in. Near the air park I also managed another look at the Ash-throated Flycatcher to end the days walk.